Tasman375

Dutch wooden boats in Hobart

Below is an excerpt from the report done by ABC News' Harriet Aird for on the Dutch participation at the 2017 Australian Wooden Boat Festival.

Dutch wooden boats in Hobart

The 'Oranje' in Hobart receives a Royal Salute by a fleet of other wooden boats. Photo Ballantyne

Australian-Dutch sailing heritage celebrated at wooden boat festival in Hobart

It might sound like a niche event, but more than 200,000 people are expected to flock to Hobart's waterfront for the 2017 Australian Wooden Boat Festival. Held every two years, the festival is the largest of its kind in the southern hemisphere and attracts visitors and boats from around the globe.

Festival-goers can observe all the boats from the safety of land, but many vessels offer the more adventurous the chance to step aboard. Features of this year's festival include an exhibition at the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery and a children's entertainment village at Parliament Lawns.

This year a Dutch theme underpins the event, recognising 375 years since the state's namesake, Abel Tasman, reached Tasmania. The festival's European co-ordinator Karen Merik said eight traditional Dutch boats would join more than 500 others on show.

"We think it's a very good way to celebrate," she said. "Both of our countries have strong maritime cultures - we have a lot of shared maritime heritage".


"Both of our countries have strong maritime cultures — we have a lot of shared maritime heritage."

 The Diephuis family, with son Lars, father André and skipper Arthur

The Diephuis family, with son Lars, father André and skipper Arthur

Skipper Arthur Diephuis has come from the Netherlands with his son Lars and father Andre to show the Dutch Royal Family's boat, The Oranje.

"A lot of sailors still want to sail wooden boats, and that proves that a wooden boat 100 years old, 200 years old, still does the trick nowadays," he said.

Article taken from ABC News Tasmania